Wednesday, January 18, 2017

2016 Warmest Year on Record Globally, NASA and NOAA Data Show

Third record-breaking year in a row for average surface temperatures

 The planet's long-term warming trend is seen in this chart of every year's annual temperature cycle from 1880 to the present, compared to the average temperature from 1880 to 2015. Record warm years are listed in the column on the right. (Credit: NASA/Joshua Stevens, Earth Observatory) Click to Enlarge.
Globally-averaged temperatures in 2016 were 1.78 degrees Fahrenheit (0.99 degrees Celsius) warmer than the mid-20th century mean.  This makes 2016 the third year in a row to set a new record for global average surface temperatures.

The 2016 temperatures continue a long-term warming trend, according to analyses by scientists at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York.  NOAA scientists concur with the finding that 2016 was the warmest year on record based on separate, independent analyses of the data.

Because weather station locations and measurement practices change over time, there are uncertainties in the interpretation of specific year-to-year global mean temperature differences.  However, even taking this into account, NASA estimates 2016 was the warmest year with greater than 95 percent certainty.

"2016 is remarkably the third record year in a row in this series," said GISS Director Gavin Schmidt.  "We don't expect record years every year, but the ongoing long-term warming trend is clear."

Read more at 2016 Warmest Year on Record Globally, NASA and NOAA Data Show

1 comment:

  1. Climate Mitigation Engineering: possibly new approach


    I would like to know if anyone is working on using ocean plankton to mitigate Climate Change using Emiliania huxleyi? It is the single biggest source of Oxygen on Earth. Eats Carbon like there is no tomorrow, and at the rate Methane is dissociating in the Artic there may not be one for kids under 12.

    Is it feasible to select and drain appropriate swamps or lakes in the Artic areas and lay pipe or cannels to bring in sea/ocean water? The latitude would of course be important. The plankton may prove to be the most cost effective way to reduce atmospheric Carbon.

    To paraphrase Bill Gates, we need to consider every option.

    Windsor ON CA