Thursday, July 18, 2019

Thursday 19

Atmospheric CO2 and Global Surface Temperature 800 to 2020

June 2019 Was the Hottest June on Record Across the Globe - NOAA

Beating the heat, tubers float the Guadalupe River, in New Braunfels, Texas, on July 18. (Credit: Reuters) Click to Enlarge.
June 2019 was the hottest in 140 years, setting a global record, according to the latest monthly global climate report released on Thursday by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The report said that the average global temperature in June was 1.71 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century average of 59.9 degrees F (15.5 degrees Celsius) and marks the 414th consecutive month in which temperatures were above the 20th-century average.  Nine of the 10 hottest Junes over the last 140 years have occurred since 2010, NOAA said.
...
Heat Wave To Scorch Midwest And East Coast, Create Dangerous Conditions For Residents.

More than 100 local heat records are expected to fall Saturday, according to the National Weather Service.

Read more at June 2019 Was the Hottest June on Record Across the Globe - NOAA

Study Bolsters Case that Climate Change Is Driving Many California Wildfires

Earth’s Future (Credit: wiley.com) Click to Enlarge.
Link seen to fivefold jump in area burned.

Against a backdrop of long-term rises in temperature in recent decades, California has seen ever higher spikes in seasonal wildfires, and, in the last two years, a string of disastrous, record-setting blazes.  This has led scientists, politicians and media to ponder: what role might warming climate be playing here?  A new study combs through the many factors that can promote wildfire, and concludes that in many, though not all, cases, warming climate is the decisive driver.  The study finds in particular that the huge summer forest fires that have raked the North Coast and Sierra Nevada regions recently have a strong connection to arid ground conditions brought on by increasing heat.  It suggests that wildfires could grow exponentially in the next 40 years, as temperatures continue to rise.

Read more at Study Bolsters Case that Climate Change Is Driving Many California Wildfires

Startup Aims to Tackle Grid Storage Problem with New Porous Silicon Battery

A Canadian company emerges from stealth mode to provide grid-scale energy storage with its high-density battery tech.


Christine Hallquist of Cross Border Power plans to commercialize a porous silicon battery design developed by Washington-based company XNRGI.(Photo Credit: Denial Documentary) Click to Enlarge.
A new Canadian company with roots in Vermont has emerged from stealth mode and has ambitious plans to roll out a new grid-scale battery in the year ahead. The longshot storage technology, targeted at utilities, offers four times the energy density and four times the lifetime of lithium-ion batteries, the company says, and will be available for half the price.

The new company’s CEO, a former Democratic nominee for governor of Vermont, founded Cross Border Power in the wake of her electoral loss last November. Within days after the election, she was at her computer and writing a thesis (since posted on her campaign website) that she boldly calls “[The] North American Solution to Climate Change.”

Read more at Startup Aims to Tackle Grid Storage Problem with New Porous Silicon Battery

Scotland’s Wind Farms Generate Enough Electricity to Power Nearly 4.5 Million Homes

The town of Ardrossan, North Ayrshire, Scotland, surrounded by an enormous wind farm. (Credit: Vincent Van Zeijst/Wikimedia Commons) Click to Enlarge.
Wind turbines in Scotland produced enough electricity in the first half of 2019 to power every home in the country twice over, according to new data by the analytics group WeatherEnergy.  The wind farms generated 9,831,320 megawatt-hours between January and June — equal to the total electricity consumption of 4.47 million homes during that same period.

The electricity generated by wind in early 2019 is enough to power all of Scotland’s homes, as well as a large portion of northern England’s.

Read more at Scotland’s Wind Farms Generate Enough Electricity to Power Nearly 4.5 Million Homes

Leaked UN Science Report Warns of Clash Between Bioenergy and Food

Models suggest large areas of land are needed for forests and biofuel crops to halt climate change, but this risks worsening hunger, draft tells policymakers.

Bioenergy crops (Photo Credit: Claire Benjamin/Flickr) Click to Enlarge.
Blanketing the globe with monocultures of forests and bioenergy crops is no dream fix to the climate crisis, a leaked draft report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warns.

Models suggest large areas of land are needed to draw carbon dioxide out of the air to limit global warming to 1.5C, the most ambitious target in the Paris Agreement.

This risks worsening hunger by competing with food production for space, according to the draft summary for policymakers obtained by Business Standard.

“Widespread use at the scale of several millions of km2 globally” of tree-planting and bioenergy crops could have “potentially irreversible consequences for food security and land degradation”, the report said.

Intensifying the production of bioenergy crops through the use of fertilizers, irrigation and monocultures could also erode soil and its capacity to soak up carbon in the long run.

Read more at Leaked UN Science Report Warns of Clash Between Bioenergy and Food